Previous month:
September 2014
Next month:
November 2014

5 posts from October 2014

Content reuse: Five key questions to consider

In the print-only days, once content was published it was rarely considered for reuse. Sure, there were the occasional “greatest hits” or “all-in-one” products, but for the most part the original content was published and forgotten about.

In the digital era it’s a lot easier to redeploy content and drive more visibility and revenue with it. Every piece of content doesn’t lend itself to reuse, of course, and there are several factors to consider before launching a reuse campaign. Here are five questions that can help you formulate a content reuse strategy:

How much reuse value does your content represent?

You need to start with an honest assessment. Don’t just assume you can remix and suddenly create a significant new revenue stream. If your content is time-sensitive it probably has a shelf life that doesn’t lend itself to redeploying today’s content tomorrow. On the other hand, evergreen content is ripe for redeployment and probably an under-leveraged asset in your organization.

What are the products and channels for your redeployed content?

Related to the first question, you also need to think about the specific products and channels you can target for your redeployed content. Focus primarily on new channels these products might enable you to enter. After all, if you’re just pushing a remix into existing channels you’re likely to cannibalize your current products.

Was your content written with reuse in mind?

This is a question most publishers overlook. Since the original product wasn’t developed for potential reuse, publishers are forced to retrofit that content for redeployment. That requires more resources (and expense) than a model where the content was originally written with reuse in mind. Think about how granular and modular your content is, how easily it can be pulled apart and reassembled, like Lego blocks. Btw, if your current editorial model wasn’t built for reuse, how can you modify it to better prep today’s incoming content for reuse tomorrow?

How “reuse-accessible” is your content?

It doesn’t matter how much your content could be reused if it’s not managed in a way that easily enables reuse. Even granular content is sometimes preserved in a manner that doesn’t let a curator go back in and easily extract just the pieces they want. So the tools you have access to as well as the format the content is saved in will have a significant impact on how easily you’ll be able to redeploy it.

Is your goal to reach new customers or simply drive more revenue from your existing customers?

A lot of publishers try to fool themselves on the answer to this one. They think they’ll magically reach new customers with a reuse model when all they end up doing is trying to sell a slightly different version of the same product to existing customers. This is probably the #1 reason for content reuse failure. As noted earlier, the more a reuse campaign can open doors to new channels, potentially reaching new customers, the greater the likelihood of success.

We’ve been thinking a lot about content reuse at Olive Software. In fact, we’re about to release a reuse tool that enables our publishers to do some very cool things with their content. Stay tuned for more details in the coming weeks…


The marketing tool every publisher undervalues

Why are publishers so scared of free and sample content? Sure, most publishers offer at least one way to test drive their content but they could be doing so much more. I think free/sample content is the single most under-utilized customer acquisition tool out there. Here’s why…

Have you noticed that most newspapers and magazines don’t offer a free e-trial. Or if they do, they bury it on their site. Most of these publishers have always offered free trials of their print product, but free e-trials are almost unheard of. If they’re concerned about chronic freeloaders, why not just give the first few pages of the replica editions?

Even the stingiest publishers let you sample a few articles on their website. I’m sure they figure they’ll at least monetize the ad impressions during that sample period but the same philosophy apparently doesn’t hold up for replica edition sampling. Even if they can’t count those replica edition sampler impressions, why not mix in some interstitial ads between pages for samplers, thereby creating an entirely new revenue stream?

Btw, Amazon, the undisputed king of data and customer acquisition, understands the value of free and sample content; that’s why they typically offer two-week test-drives for newspapers and magazines. Why aren’t publishers following Amazon’s lead? Don’t forget the benefit of gathering prospective new customer names and email addresses; these readers may not opt in immediately but you’ll have a link to market to them in the future.

Then there’s the opportunity for book publishers… Why aren’t they creating super-sized samples available exclusively on their websites? The book samples available on the major retailer sites are generally the same ones publishers offer on their own sites. That’s a huge missed opportunity to establish a direct relationship with those customers.

I realize plenty of book publishers feel it’s hopeless creating a direct-to-consumer channel. They’re clearly not trying very hard though. Here’s another tip: The first thing a reader should see when they open your ebook is a note from the publisher thanking them for their purchase and a link to your site where they’ll find these exclusive, super-sized samples I’m talking about. They should include this messaging in all copies, including the ones sold by retailers. That’s right…use the retailer channels to build your direct channel.

Lastly, how easy are you making it for readers to share that free sample with others? Most publishers put their sample content under lock and key, missing out on the opportunity for pass-along to family and friends of those reading the samples.

Publishers, it’s time to re-think your free/sample content strategy. Learn a lesson from Amazon and start fully leveraging all that terrific content you have to share.


The future of digital content on the road

My wife and I recently returned from an anniversary trip to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. If you ever have the opportunity to go there, do it; we have nothing but terrific things to say about the city, people and food. The trip opened my eyes to the opportunities that exist for digital content to enhance the travel/vacation experience.

Unlike most hotels in the U.S., our resort didn’t include free wifi access. They instead offer something akin to 1990’s dial-up speeds at $10/day for each device. This model is likely designed to both gouge guests and encourage them to unplug during their stay. I’m sure it works but there are better options that would benefit both the resort and the guests. For example, how about turning the wifi network into a gateway to rich content, services and special offers?

Let’s start by offering a couple of wifi access tiers. A free model includes a slower connection that’s partially subsidized by ads. A paid option offers a faster connection with no ads. It’s the same model you see in many airports today. It’s not the connection that matters though, but rather the content and overall experience the connection provides.

Most travelers are hungry for recommendations of the best local meals, deals and happenings. Here’s where the adaptive content model and opting in to data sharing starts to pay real dividends. The more my app/device knows about my habits and interests the better it can provide relevant content and deals. Think of it as a virtual concierge, but unlike the hotel concierge who knows nothing about you, the virtual concierge has a pretty good idea of what you like to eat, where you’d like to visit, etc.

Let’s also roll in an opportunity for publishers to provide relevant content, acquire new customers and plant the seeds for additional engagement with those customers. How about giving me free access to a daily e-newspaper, for example? And please don’t pick that e-newspaper for me; let me choose one from a list of hundreds offered. When someone’s on the road they like to keep up with news back home. Many of those travelers don’t subscribe to their local newspaper, so what a great opportunity for publishers to expose their terrific product to new prospective readers. Capture names and email address if you must, but be sure to end the trip with an irresistible discount on becoming a full-time subscriber.

This is an opportunity for book publishers as well. Why not offer special samplers to get readers hooked on your authors and products? Better yet, offer access to short works travelers will be able to finish on the trip. Make recommendations (based on data accessible through the adaptive content model) so readers don’t have to spend too much time hunting for something that’s just right for them. This is where the service can combine the knowledge of personal interests (including how fast the user reads) with the visitor’s length of stay to recommend works of certain lengths. Since the content is free the publisher should feel comfortable pitching other products in the reading app. This is another opportunity to capture reader names and email addresses for follow-up marketing activities.

Let’s also not forget that many of these ideas can be extended further with an affiliate program for the hotel or resort; they’re bringing in the customers so publishers and proprietors should be willing to pay finder’s fees from the resulting revenue.

I’m only scratching the surface here but you get the idea. Just as digital books, newspapers and magazines will eventually evolve beyond the print-under-glass model that exists today, I’m confident digital content will find its way into new services like this that can significantly enhance the travel experience.


What is “adaptive content”?

That’s a question a few people asked me via email after a webinar I co-presented last week. I briefly mentioned it on one of my webinar slides but I didn’t spend a lot of time digging into it. 

I talked about how the concept of layering enables publishers to turn their static e-products into dynamic, premium offerings. Layering is just the first step towards adaptive content. I’ll also admit that my definition of adaptive content is different from what you’ll read elsewhere.

A quick Google search shows a variety of articles and opinions on the definition and future of adaptive content. I’m not suggesting the perspectives found via those links are wrong; I just believe they’re not going far enough.

You’ll find plenty of people who talk about adaptive content in the context of distribution channels and devices. (The latter, btw, borders more on responsive design IMHO.) What you don’t see much of in the existing dialog on adaptive content is the actual user, the person reading the content.

So when I talk about adaptive design I’m envisioning it not from a channel or device POV. I’m thinking more about the user, their experience, tendencies and interests. That sounds creepy, I know, but it’s going to happen. Twenty years ago most people would have balked at the notion of an email app that presents you with ads based on subjects it deems relevant to the contents of your inbox. Today, however, Gmail does just that and reportedly has hundreds of millions of users.

At some point down the road digital content apps (including your web browser) will use similar capabilities to present that how-to ebook or e-zine in a manner that’s completely tailored to you. And you’ll never have to tell it a thing for it to spin up that custom experience. Our devices (and the apps loaded on them) will constantly track your behavior and use that information to dynamically present the next piece of content.

Let’s say you and I are building decks and we just bought the same digital how-to product with step-by-step instructions and videos. Your tablet knows you’re quite familiar with power tools and construction projects because it’s noted that you’ve contributed several knowledgeable (and highly-rated) answers on one of the popular DIY forums. Your tablet also knows that you regularly read the most popular DIY e-zines and that you tend to focus on articles covering lumber construction projects. 

I, on the other hand, hardly know the difference between a hammer and a screwdriver and my tablet is well aware of my lack of knowledge on the deck-building topic. 

So the content and pace of the digital how-to product we both bought is presented in one manner on your tablet and in a completely different manner on mine. The source content is all the same and you can certainly drill down into more of the basics that I’m presented with, but the app assumes you’re beyond all that.

This changes everything, of course. Content must be written in a more granular manner and it must be richly tagged to ensure it’s presented properly in every use-case. Equally important is the need for the app/device to pay attention to how the content is then consumed by all these different users and make adjustments for future users. Maybe nine out of the first ten novices jump to a later topic that appears later in the product; the app should learn from this and rearrange the content sequence for the eleventh novice.

Yes, this type of model will require users to opt in and privacy advocates will completely freak out over the possible consequences of such a platform. The benefits will far outweigh the risks though, and I’m convinced this vision of adaptive content will become a reality down the road.


Recorded version of Olive SmartLayers webinar

If you missed yesterday's webinar, where we unveiled Olive's new SmartLayers technology, you'll want to watch the recorded version below. It was a great discussion about where digital content is today and where it's likely heading tomorrow. Check it out and let us know what you think of these first steps towards a model where content is eventually both layered and adaptive.