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    © 2014, Joseph B. Wikert
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« P.R. Honesty | Main | O’Reilly’s Computer Book Market Analysis »

April 19, 2006

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Amazon’s “What do customers ultimately buy…” Feature:

» What customers ultimently buy... from Brad Abrams
Amazon has a cool new feature on many of there pages called “What do customers ultimately buy after viewing... [Read More]

Comments

Laura Lemay

Hey Joe. Amazon has said in their quarterly reports that Prime hasn't been nearly as popular as they had hoped.

Watch out for the free trial, though. I got one over the holidays and became instantly addicted to it. I still think its too expensive -- $50 would have been fine -- but I still renewed it when it came up. Damn you, Amazon!

Juliana Aldous Atkinson

Thanks Joe! The LA Times profiled author Cliff Atkinson this past week which definitly impacted sales!
(http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-powerpoint19apr19,1,7569014.story?ctrack=1&cset=true)

Bill Bender

Joe,

I wonder about the part of this Amazon’s “What do customers ultimately buy…” feature in terms of how they group items. You wrote "I assume Amazon has coded all their products with a field indicating which ones are alike". Have you heard anything further about that?

I can't imagine Amazon incurring the nightmarish maintenance of tagging all their items to make this feature work unless they allow their data feeds to incorporate this information for those items that will then have this feature enabled.

Perhaps they simply use the wisdom of the crowds for this part of the feature as well. Once they've gotten a critical mass of data for certain items, they can safely assume that any items viewed and purchased in the same session are related and, at that point, they allow this feature to be displayed.

I've also come across items where the "What other's purchased" list includes a questionably-related item. For instance, if you look at the Amazon.com page for "The Secret (Hardcover)" book, the "What Others Buy" section mentions that "1% buy Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7) by J. K. Rowling". Of course that could be mistagged by human error.

Thanks for an interesting blog.

Bill

Joe Wikert

Hi Bill. No, I haven't heard anything further on this. I suspect you may be right though and that it would be overwhelming to manually code each and every item. The fact that odd matches seem to be surfacing every now and then would only underscore that point, I suppose.

Annerose

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